Anglo German Agreement Of 1890

German-English Treaty (Helgoland-Zanzibar Treaty) (July 1, 1890) The misleading name of the treaty was introduced by former Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, who wanted to attack his despised successor Caprivi to conclude an agreement that Bismarck himself had organized during his tenure. However, Bismarck`s nomenclature meant that Germany had exchanged an African empire for the tiny Helgoland (“pants for a button”). [4] This was zealously taken up by imperialists who complained of “treason” against German interests. Carl Peters and Alfred Hugenberg launched a call for the creation of the German Association, which took place in 1891. [5] reached, on behalf of their respective governments, after discussions on various issues relating to the colonial interests of Germany and Great Britain: the Helgoland-Zanzibar Treaty (also known as the Anglo-German Agreement of 1890) was adopted on the 1st Agreement signed between the German Empire and Great Britain on 7 July 1890. In East Africa, Germany`s area of influence is delimited as follows: Germany obtained the islands of Helgoland (German: Helgoland) in the North Sea, originally the Danish part Holstein-Gottorp, but since 1814 the British property, the so-called Caprivi strip in present-day Namibia, and carte blanche to control and acquire the coast of Dar es Salaam, which is the core of German East Africa (later Tanganjika, B. the continental component of Tanzania). [2] Turkey complied with it. Holland has not yet given him any responsibility. Her British Majesty`s Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Sir Edward Baldwin Malet, asked the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he had been warned that in exchange for Article VIII, Germany had recognised British authority in Zanzibar. Helgoland was needed to control the new North Baltic Canal and approaches to German ports to the North Sea.

Britain used Nun Zanzibar as a key link in British control of East Africa. [1] The article does not provide for such an authorization. Either the treaty with Zanzibar must be maintained, or the coast must be placed under the free trade provision of the Berlin Law. In both cases, British trade is fully protected against excessive or differential treatment. The fourth article of the Treaty of Zanzibar, which provides for total freedom of trade and navigation between the Contracting Parties, contains this provision: – The Sultan of Zanzibar undertakes not to authorize or recognize the creation of a monopoly or exclusive commercial privilege within his masters of a government, association or individual. . . .